Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Children Learn What They Live

 
Three-year-old Janessa already knows that reading to her child is the secret ingredient for enhancing imagination, education, and inspiration. Who's reading at your house today?

40 comments:

  1. Best way to be, read away and let them read. Writing, does that count at my feed?

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    1. To me writing counts. You have to read what you've written at some point. :-)

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  2. I swear I've been reading since I was born. I had a library card before I went to kindergarten and I was 4 when I started K.

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    1. Wow. That is young. I don't remember when I got my first library card, but I also don't remember a time that there weren't books in our house. :-)

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  3. Aww, so cute. And I couldn't agree more -- reading to a child, showing her how important reading is, having books all over the house, is immensely important. We teach through example, not through lecturing. Little Janessa is on the tight track. You nailed it with that title, Deb -- Children most definitely learn what they live.

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    1. Thanks for stopping by, Silvia. Isn't Janessa a cutie?

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  4. **correction: ... on the 'right track' :)

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  5. That's adorable! I was the same way when I was a child. :)

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    1. Me too. I'm thinking she'll always be a reader, and maybe someday a writer. :-)

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  6. Very cute.

    I think my 4yo daughter has a larger physical library than I do.

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    1. I can see how that could happen. It's hard not to buy a kid a new book.

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  7. This is great! I love this picture and it is proof that books will always be around to enhance and open ones' mind. Great!

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    1. I agree. Thanks for stopping by, Brigit.

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  8. My daughter is muttering bad words under her breath while holding To Kill a Mockingbird open in one hand and typing an essay on symbolism with the other. Does that count?

    Sadly, she did not enjoy the book. :( Some school assignments need to be re-titled To Kill a Good Book.

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    1. Forced reading is never as enjoyable as reading by choice. That's too bad.

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    2. Won't she be happy to know that Harper is finally coming out with a sequel. :-) I have to be honest – I loved the book. I'm looking forward to the second one.

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    3. I loved To Kill a Mockingbird, too. (And I can't say that about every book I was assigned to read. Don't get my started on Moby Dick and Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.) I did enjoy some strange ones I would never have picked up on my own: Catch-22 and As I Lay Dying.

      Don't think my daughter will be convinced to pick up another Harper Lee book, though.

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    4. There are probably a lot of kids today who won't be standing in line for a copy. When you compare it to fast-paced teen novels being published now, it would be considered quite slow. Even the mysteries are fast-paced.

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  9. When mine were very young, they would fall asleep with books in bed with them! Little Girl just had a test today on The Red Badge of Courage, and came home asking me for my opinion on her essay answers. It makes me happy.

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    1. I'll bet. And what a great book to be reading!

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  10. This is an awesome picture. Children really do learn what they live...

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    1. Most of the time, that's a good thing, but then ... :-)

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  11. My kids have had books in their hands since they were babies. I still read to my youngest at bed time. Reading certainly does help develop imagination.

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    1. Yes, along with better vocabularies and conceptual thinking. :-) Thanks for stopping by, Sherry.

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  12. My kids have had books in their hands since they were babies. I still read to my youngest at bed time. Reading certainly does help develop imagination.

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  13. That's awesome. We read in our house every day. Naturally! :)

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  14. the gift of reading or being read to from baby/childhood - one of the greatest ones!

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    1. Yeah, I can't think of a better gift, really.

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  15. Aw, this is so adorable. Gotta love reading! :)

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    1. Yep! :-) Thanks for paying my blog a visit, Heather.

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  16. That is so cute and she is such a bright child.

    My granddaughter Ava used to spend overnights here with us fairly frequently when she was a toddler. I'd read one, two, three, the number seemed to grow...every night at bed time. After I'd kiss her goodnight and leave the room she'd take the books and make believe she was reading them, saying the words she had memorized while paging thru the books sometimes up side down. Now she's five and she love love loves reading books.

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    1. That's really great. And doesn't it feel good to know you helped develop that love of reading?

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  17. Well, today around this place, that's going to be me. Oh, my husband will pick up a magazine and read that, too. Probably finance or news. I'll dive into another fiction written by one of my friends. All my kids are readers, and thank heaven for that.

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    1. My kids all love to read, too, and they all have different favorite authors, but a few are loved by all.

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  18. Awww, that's really sweet. I didn't discover books until I started school. After that, I was never without a book. I loved reading to my daughter when she was young. I really miss it.

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    1. Now you can look forward to reading great stories to your grandchildren. :-)

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  19. Replies
    1. Me too. My favorite pastime (along with snacking.) :-)

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